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Psychology

Rotter, j. b., rafferty, j. e., & lotsof, a. b. (1954).

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Week 6 Discussion: Projective Techniques – Instructions
Despite trying to remain objective, individuals’ personalities and personal interpretations might unconsciously influence their responses to personality assessments. Projective techniques attempt to tap into this unconsciousness. Unlike the directness of self-report inventories, these performance-based measures rely on interpreting the performance of clients as they respond to ambiguous stimuli. Projective techniques include the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), the House-Tree-Person (HTP), the Tell-Me-A-Story (TEMAS), and the Incomplete Sentence Blank tests (ISB). As a psychologist, in what circumstances might projective techniques be an effective assessment method?
For this Discussion, review this week’s Learning Resources. Select two projective instruments from the following list: Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), House-Tree-Person (HTP) Test, Incomplete Sentence Blank (ISB), and Tell-Me-A-Story (TEMAS) Assessment. Consider the similarities and differences between the two instruments you selected and the insights you gained from your comparison. Finally, think about three challenges related to the use of the instruments you selected.
With these thoughts in mind:
By Day 4
Post by Day 4 a comparison (similarities and differences) of the two projective instruments you selected and explain what insight you gained from making that comparison. Explain three challenges related to the use of the projective instruments you selected.
Week 6 Learning Resources
Flanagan, R., & Di Giuseppe, R. (1999). Critical Review of the Temas: A Step within the Development of Thematic Apperception Instruments. Psychology in the Schools, 36(1), 21. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1520-6807(199901)36:13.0.CO;2-L
Garb, H. N., Wood, J. M., Lilienfeld, S. O., & Nezworski, M. T. (2002). Effective use of projective techniques in clinical practice: Let the data help with selection and interpretation. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 33(5), 454–463. https://doi.org/10.1037/0735-7028.33.5.454
Hibbard, S. (2003). A Critique of Lilienfeld et al.’s (2000) “The Scientific Status of Projective Techniques.” Journal of Personality Assessment, 80(3), 260–271. https://doi.org/10.1207/S15327752JPA8003_05
Joiner Jr., T. E., Schmidt, K. L., & Barnett, J. (1996). Size, Detail, and Line Heaviness in Children’s Drawings as Correlates of Emotional Distress: (More) Negative Evidence. Journal of Personality Assessment, 67(1), 127. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327752jpa6701_10
Rotter, J. B., Rafferty, J. E., & Lotsof, A. B. (1954). The validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank: High School Form. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 18(2), 105–111. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0062560
Strange, D., Van Papendrecht, H. H., Crawford, E., Candel, I., & Hayne, H. (2010). Size doesn’t matter: emotional content does not determine the size of objects in children’s drawings. PSYCHOLOGY CRIME & LAW, 16(6), 459–476. https://doi.org/10.1080/10683160902862213

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